Now a message from the dissenting Supreme Court Justices on their take of the majority opinion


The Wall Street Journal

ObamaCare and the Power to Tax

‘Judicial tax-writing is particularly troubling. Taxes have never been popular, see, e.g., Stamp Act of 1765.’

As the Stamp ACT of 1765 led to the Boston Tea Party

Supreme Court Justices Antonin Scalia, Anthony Kennedy, Clarence Thomas and Samuel Alito dissenting from the majority opinion that upheld most provisions of the Affordable Care Act on Thursday:

Comment by Jim Campbell, Citizen Journalist

Let’s not forget that Harry Reid in his lust for the endgame used the Senate version to fund Obama Care.  Sorry Harry, though you and your ilk could care less about the Constitution, the Senate has no authority or power to fund anything, that is left to the House of representatives.

Now, Senate GOP Will Use Reconciliation in Attempt to Repeal Obamacare and will only require 51 votes not 60 to stick this legislation where it belongs.   Trust the vote will be held before the election, and many moderate Democrats running for election in 2012 will not want to face their constituents having failed on this attempt to vote it down.

That’s my story and I’m sticking to it, I’m J.C. and I approve this message.

The provision challenged under the Constitution is either a penalty or else a tax. Of course in many cases what was a regulatory mandate enforced by a penalty could have been imposed as a tax upon permissible action; or what was imposed as a tax upon permissible action could have been a regulatory mandate enforced by a penalty. But we know of no case, and the Government cites none, in which the imposition was, for constitutional purposes, both.

The two are mutually exclusive. Thus, what the Government’s caption should have read was “ALTERNATIVELY, THE MINIMUM COVERAGE PROVISION IS NOT A MANDATE-WITH-PENALTY BUT A TAX.” It is important to bear this in mind in evaluating the tax argument of the Government and of those who support it: The issue is not whether Congress had the power to frame the minimum-coverage provision as a tax, but whether it did so.

Former solicitor general Paul Clement on the legal implications of the Supreme Court decision. (See entire dissenting opinions below.)

In answering that question we must, if “fairly possible,” construe the provision to be a tax rather than a mandate-with-penalty, since that would render it constitutional rather than unconstitutional (ut res magis valeat quam pereat). But we cannot rewrite the statute to be what it is not. “[A]lthough this Court will often strain to construe legislation so as to save it against constitutional attack, it must not and will not carry this to the point of perverting the purpose of a statute . . . or judicially rewriting it.” In this case, there is simply no way, “without doing violence to the fair meaning of the words used,” to escape what Congress enacted: a mandate that individuals maintain minimum essential coverage, enforced by a penalty.

Our cases establish a clear line between a tax and a penalty: “[A] tax is an enforced contribution to provide for the support of government; a penalty . . . is an exaction imposed by statute as punishment for an unlawful act.” In a few cases, this Court has held that a “tax” imposed upon private conduct was so onerous as to be in effect a penalty. But we have never held—never—that a penalty imposed for violation of the law was so trivial as to be in effect a tax. We have never held that any exaction imposed for violation of the law is an exercise of Congress’ taxing power—even when the statute calls it a tax, much less when (as here) the statute repeatedly calls it a penalty. When an act “adopt[s] the criteria of wrongdoing” and then imposes a monetary penalty as the “principal consequence on those who transgress its standard,” it creates a regulatory penalty, not a tax.

So the question is, quite simply, whether the exaction here is imposed for violation of the law. It unquestionably is. The minimum-coverage provision is found in [the Affordable Care Act's individual-mandate provision], §5000A, entitled “Requirement to maintain minimum essential coverage.” (Emphasis added.) It commands that every “applicable individual shall . . . ensure that the individual . . . is covered under minimum essential coverage.” (emphasis added). And the immediately following provision states that, “[i]f . . . an applicable individual . . . fails to meet the requirement of subsection (a) . . . there is hereby imposed . . . a penalty.” (emphasis added). And several of Congress’ legislative “findings” with regard to §5000A confirm that it sets forth a legal requirement and constitutes the assertion of regulatory power, not mere taxing power. . . .

We never have classified as a tax an exaction imposed for violation of the law, and so too, we never have classified as a tax an exaction described in the legislation itself as a penalty. To be sure, we have sometimes treated as a tax a statutory exaction (imposed for something other than a violation of law) which bore an agnostic label that does not entail the significant constitutional consequences of a penalty—such as “license” or “surcharge.” But we have never—never—treated as a tax an exaction which faces up to the critical difference between a tax and a penalty, and explicitly denominates the exaction a “penalty.” Eighteen times in §5000A itself and elsewhere throughout the Act, Congress called the exaction in §5000A(b) a “penalty.” . . .

Judicial tax-writing is particularly troubling. Taxes have never been popular, see, e.g., Stamp Act of 1765, and in part for that reason, the Constitution requires tax increases to originate in the House of Representatives. That is to say, they must originate in the legislative body most accountable to the people, where legislators must weigh the need for the tax against the terrible price they might pay at their next election, which is never more than two years off. The Federalist No. 58 “defend[ed] the decision to give the origination power to the House on the ground that the Chamber that is more accountable to the people should have the primary role in raising revenue.” We have no doubt that Congress knew precisely what it was doing when it rejected an earlier version of this legislation that imposed a tax instead of a requirement-with-penalty. Imposing a tax through judicial legislation inverts the constitutional scheme, and places the power to tax in the branch of government least accountable to the citizenry.

Finally, we must observe that rewriting §5000A as a tax in order to sustain its constitutionality would force us to confront a difficult constitutional question: whether this is a direct tax that must be apportioned among the States according to their population. Perhaps it is not (we have no need to address the point); but the meaning of the Direct Tax Clause is famously unclear, and its application here is a question of first impression that deserves more thoughtful consideration than the lick-and-a-promise accorded by the Government and its supporters. The Government’s opening brief did not even address the question—perhaps because, until today, no federal court has accepted the implausible argument that §5000A is an exercise of the tax power. And once respondents raised the issue, the Government devoted a mere 21 lines of its reply brief to the issue. At oral argument, the most prolonged statement about the issue was just over 50 words. One would expect this Court to demand more than fly-by-night briefing and argument before deciding a difficult constitutional question of first impression.

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One response to “Now a message from the dissenting Supreme Court Justices on their take of the majority opinion

  1. Regina McGlashen

    Obama clearly lied in 2008 when he promised no new taxes.This tax will be higher than snoopdog on a good day.
    If for nothing else, Obama’s supporters should be able to recognize a liar and a fraud when they see one, but maybe they are so used to politicians telling lies and being deceitful it is par for the course.
    The tax will kill the middle class working people until they give up and fall on the government rolls too. Doesnt take a genius to figure out that no generated revenue means bottoming out financially.
    Where will Obama then get funds to pay for healthcare for all Americans and his non-American pals? What does he care…. he is set for life already with the pension and can boogy back to Kenya where he has been busy fixin’ up the digs to accommodate his newly acquired champagne tastes in living high.
    I hope all the non loyal-American democrats are pleased that they are contributing to the destruction of our nation and they all get exactly what they deserve!

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